History of Tombstone Arizona (part 1)

Signature of Ed Schieffelin, a prospector who ...

Tombstone Ariona is one of those places that intrigues me, for some unknown reason or another. While I was researching the history of the town, I came across some difficulties finding verifiable information. There was little or no census info., and the info. in the Tombstone local library wasn’t the same as the historical information found online. It was very frustrating, but it seemed that the stories of good old Tombstone being told by the tourist wranglers, tour guides, and local venues were really the ones that the city was standing by. I could find no death records for the prominent years that the city was in operation as a mining town. An explaination for this is that there were so many travelers in and out of the city, that it was impossible to keep track of all that died, most before even 24 hours of residency. Another good excuse was that people didn’t carry identification at that time.

Signature of Ed Schieffelin, a prospector who discovered silver in Cochise County, Arizona Territory in 1877, which led to the founding of Tombstone, Arizona (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
English: Ed Schieffelin during a visit to the ...

English: Ed Schieffelin during a visit to the Yukon River in Alaska in 1882. Cropped version of original image. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The Bird Cage Theater as it appears today.

The Bird Cage Theater as it appears today. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Ed Schieffelin discovered the Tombstone distri...

Ed Schieffelin discovered the Tombstone district in 1877 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: was built by Albert Schieffelin, brot...

English: was built by Albert Schieffelin, brother of Tombstone, Arizona founder Ed Schieffelin, and William Harwood as a first class opera house, theater, recital hall, and a meeting place for Tombstone citizens. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Tombstone

Tombstone (Photo credit: bugmonkey)

TOMBSTONE ARIZONA HISTORY

Underground America is looking for sponsorship in order to funda documentary series on this town andmany others like it. Ask ushow you can help makethis video series happen!!
HERE IS A COMPILATION OF INFORMATION ABOUT THE HISTORY OF TOMBSTONE,  GATHERED FROM MANY WEBSITES LISTED AT THE END OF THE BLOG. ENJOY! I do not own any of these images, the websites they are hosted on, or the copyrighted clip art or formats used on the host sites.
Historic Allen StreetA BRIEF HISTORY OF TOMBSTONE
Ed SchieffelinTombstone was founded in 1877 by a prospector named Ed Schieffelin.   Ed was staying at what was then called Camp Huachuca (wa-chu-ka) as part of a scouting expedition against the Chiricahua (chir-i-cow-uh) Apaches.   During his time there he would venture out into the wilderness “looking for rocks”, all the while ignoring the warnings he received from the soldiers at the camp.   They would tell him, “Ed, the only stone you will find out there will be your tombstone”.   Well, Ed did find his stone.   And it was Silver.   So, remembering the words of warning from the soldiers, he named his first mine The Tombstone.Click here to learn more about Ed Schieffelin
Tombstone in 1881It wasn’t long before word spread about Ed’s silver strike. Soon prospectors, cowboys, homesteaders, lawyers, speculators, gunmen and business people flocked to the area in droves. In 1879 a town site was laid out on the nearest level spot to the mines, known at that time as Goose Flats, and was appropriately named “Tombstone” after Ed Schieffelin’s first mining claim.
Parade down Allen Street in the late 1800'sBy the mid 1880’s Tombstone’s population had increased to around 7,500. This figure counted only the white male registered voters that were over 21 years of age. If you take into account the women, children, Chinese, Mexicans and the many “ladies of the evening” the estimates are that the population was between 15,000 and 20,000 people. At its peak, it is said to have been the fastest growing city between St. Louis and San Francisco. There were over one hundred saloons, numerous restaurants, a large red-light district, an even larger Chinese population, schools, churches, newspapers, and one of the first public swimming pools in Arizona (which is still used today).
Historic Schieffelin HallThere were a few theaters in town, the most famous of them being Schieffelin Hall and the Bird Cage Theatre. Schieffelin Hall was where the “respectable” people in town went for entertainment. It opened in June of 1881 and was built for the people of Tombstone by Ed Schieffelin’s Brother Al. It is the largest standing adobe structure in the southwest United States and was built to be used as a theater, recital hall and a meeting place for Tombstone Citizens. Wyatt and Morgan Earp attended a performance there the evening that Morgan was killed by an assassin’s bullet. It is still in use today by city government and civic groups.CLICK HERE to buy a vintage image of
historic Schieffelin Hall.

Birdcage Theatre

The Bird Cage Theatre is another story. It was a saloon, theater, gambling hall and brothel. Legend has it that no self-respecting woman in town would even walk on the same side of the street as the Bird Cage Theatre. It opened its doors on Christmas Day 1881 and ran 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year until closing its doors in 1889. In 1882, The New York Times reported, “the Bird Cage Theatre is the wildest, wickedest night spot between Basin Street and the Barbary Coast.” Evidence of this can still be seen in the 140 supposed bullet holes that have been found in the walls and ceiling. The Bird Cage was named for the cage style crib compartments suspended from the ceiling. It was in these “Bird Cages” that the “ladies of the evening” entertained their customers. The story goes that they were the inspiration for the song, “She’s only a bird in a gilded cage”, which was quite popular during the early 1900’s.

After the fire of 1882

Two major fires swept through Tombstone during the 1880’s. Legend has it that in June of 1881 a cigar ignited a barrel of whiskey at the Arcade Saloon. The subsequent fire destroyed over 60 businesses in the downtown area. But the town rebuilt itself and kept on growing. In May of 1882 another fire ripped through downtown Tombstone destroying a large portion of the business district. Again, the town rebuilt.

Welcome to Boothill Graveyard

Tombstone is also the home of Boothill Graveyard. Boothill began in 1879 and was used until 1884 when the New Tombstone City Cemetery was opened on west Allen Street. After the opening of the new cemetery, Boothill became known as “The Old Cemetery”. The City cemetery is still in use today. Legend has it that Boothill was named for the fact that many residents there died violent or unexpected deaths and were buried with their boots on. However, it was actually named Boothill after Dodge City’s pioneer cemetery in the hopes of attracting tourists in the late 1920’s. Many famous Tombstone folks lie there including the victims of the 1881 Shootout on Fremont Street between the Earps and the Cowboys. For many years, it was neglected. The desert overtook parts of it and vandals removed grave markers. Then, in the 1920’s concerned citizens began the process of cleaning up the Old Cemetery and researching the placement of the graves to preserve it for future generations (and to make a little money on tourism).

Click here to learn more about Tombstone’s Cemeteries.

Restored OK Corral Site

The most famous event in Tombstone’s history was the famed Gunfight at the OK Corral, which didn’t actually happen at the corral, but in a vacant lot on Fremont Street. On October 26, 1881, members of the “Cowboys” had a run-in with Wyatt, Virgil and Morgan Earp with help from Wyatt’s friend Doc Holliday. 24 seconds and 30 shots later, Billy Clanton, Tom and Frank McLaury were mortally wounded. In many peoples opinion, it was this one event that has kept Tombstone alive for all these years.

the 1882 Cochise County CourthouseIn 1882 the Cochise County Courthouse was built at a cost of around $45,000. It provided offices for the county sheriff, recorder, treasurer, board of supervisors, and included a well-built jail. The courthouse was a comfortable symbol of law and stability in these turbulent times. The county seat remained in Tombstone until voters in 1929 chose to move it to Bisbee, a bustling copper mining town 29 miles away. The last county office left the courthouse in 1931. Budget cuts in 2010 by Gov. Jan Brewer almost forced the Museums closure. Luckily the Tombstone Chamber of Commerce stepped in and met the demands from the state to take over operation of the museum.

Click here to learn more about the old Cochise County Courthouse

Abandoned buildings on Allen Street in the 1940's

As the silver mining continued the mineshafts were dug deeper and deeper to get the precious ore. Once they hit the 520 foot level, the water table was reached which flooded the mines. Attempts to pump out the water marginally worked for a few years but soon became too costly to continue. As the mining slowed down, the people of Tombstone started leaving, but not before $37,000,000 worth of ore had been taken from the many mines in the area. It is estimated that by the early 1930’s Tombstone’s population dwindled to around 150 people.

View of Tombstone

Today, Tombstone is home to around 1500 year round residents who enjoy the wonderful climate that Cochise County’s high desert has to offer and believe in preserving the history and heritage of the Wildest Town in the West!


TOMBSTONE
NAME: Tombstone
COUNTY: Cochise
ROADS: 2WD paved
LEGAL INFO: T20S, R22E
CLIMATE: Mild winter, hot summer
BEST TIME TO VISIT: Anytime
COMMENTS: Many ghost towns in the area that are worth seeing. Video available, see below.
REMAINS: Many original buildings and cemetery.

Tombstone’s post office was established December 2, 1878 and has yet to be discontinued. Tombstone is the most famous of Arizona mining camps with its colorful history. Discovered by Ed Schieffelin in 1878, the mine went on to produce millions. Tombstone had over 15,000 residents at one time. Fires nearly caused the death of Tombstone twice but the town was resilient. Famous for the O.K. Corral shootout with the Earps and Boot Hill cemetery, Tombstone is well worth the visit! – GTombstone Ariona is one of those places that intrigues me, for some unknown reason or another. While I was researching the history of the town, I came across some difficulties finding verifiable information. There was little or no census info., and the info. in the Tombstone local library wasn’t the same as the historical information found online. It was very frustrating, but it seemed that the stories of good old Tombstone being told by the tourist wranglers, tour guides, and local venues were really the ones that the city was standing by. I could find no death records for the prominent years that the city was in operation as a mining town. An explaination for this is that there were so many travelers in and out of the city, that it was impossible to keep track of all that died, most before even 24 hours of residency. Another good excuse was that people didn’t carry identification at that time.

History of Tombstone Arizona (part 1)

Posted by Thornie

Signature of Ed Schieffelin, a prospector who ...

Signature of Ed Schieffelin, a prospector who discovered silver in Cochise County, Arizona Territory in 1877, which led to the founding of Tombstone, Arizona (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Signature of Ed Schieffelin, a prospector who discovered silver in Cochise County, Arizona Territory in 1877, which led to the founding of Tombstone, Arizona (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: Ed Schieffelin during a visit to the Yukon River in Alaska in 1882. Cropped version of original image. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The Bird Cage Theater as it appears today. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Ed Schieffelin discovered the Tombstone district in 1877 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: was built by Albert Schieffelin, brother of Tombstone, Arizona founder Ed Schieffelin, and William Harwood as a first class opera house, theater, recital hall, and a meeting place for Tombstone citizens. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Tombstone (Photo credit: bugmonkey)

TOMBSTONE ARIZONA HISTORY

Underground America is looking for sponsorship inorder to funda documentary series on this town andmany others like it. Ask ushow you can help make

this video series happen!!

HERE IS A COMPILATION OF INFORMATION ABOUT THE HISTORY OF TOMBSTONE,  GATHERED FROM MANY WEBSITES LISTED AT THE END OF THE BLOG. ENJOY! I do not own any of these images, the websites they are hosted on, or the copyrighted clip art or formats used on the host sites.
Historic Allen StreetA BRIEF HISTORY OF TOMBSTONE
Ed SchieffelinTombstone was founded in 1877 by a prospector named Ed Schieffelin.   Ed was staying at what was then called Camp Huachuca (wa-chu-ka) as part of a scouting expedition against the Chiricahua (chir-i-cow-uh) Apaches.   During his time there he would venture out into the wilderness “looking for rocks”, all the while ignoring the warnings he received from the soldiers at the camp.   They would tell him, “Ed, the only stone you will find out there will be your tombstone”.   Well, Ed did find his stone.   And it was Silver.   So, remembering the words of warning from the soldiers, he named his first mine The Tombstone.Click here to learn more about Ed Schieffelin
Tombstone in 1881It wasn’t long before word spread about Ed’s silver strike. Soon prospectors, cowboys, homesteaders, lawyers, speculators, gunmen and business people flocked to the area in droves. In 1879 a town site was laid out on the nearest level spot to the mines, known at that time as Goose Flats, and was appropriately named “Tombstone” after Ed Schieffelin’s first mining claim.
Parade down Allen Street in the late 1800'sBy the mid 1880′s Tombstone’s population had increased to around 7,500. This figure counted only the white male registered voters that were over 21 years of age. If you take into account the women, children, Chinese, Mexicans and the many “ladies of the evening” the estimates are that the population was between 15,000 and 20,000 people. At its peak, it is said to have been the fastest growing city between St. Louis and San Francisco. There were over one hundred saloons, numerous restaurants, a large red-light district, an even larger Chinese population, schools, churches, newspapers, and one of the first public swimming pools in Arizona (which is still used today).
Historic Schieffelin HallThere were a few theaters in town, the most famous of them being Schieffelin Hall and the Bird Cage Theatre. Schieffelin Hall was where the “respectable” people in town went for entertainment. It opened in June of 1881 and was built for the people of Tombstone by Ed Schieffelin’s Brother Al. It is the largest standing adobe structure in the southwest United States and was built to be used as a theater, recital hall and a meeting place for Tombstone Citizens. Wyatt and Morgan Earpattended a performance there the evening that Morgan was killed by an assassin’s bullet. It is still in use today by city government and civic groups.

CLICK HERE to buy a vintage image of
historic Schieffelin Hall.

Birdcage Theatre

The Bird Cage Theatre is another story. It was a saloon, theater, gambling hall and brothel. Legend has it that no self-respecting woman in town would even walk on the same side of the street as the Bird Cage Theatre. It opened its doors on Christmas Day 1881 and ran 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year until closing its doors in 1889. In 1882, The New York Times reported, “the Bird Cage Theatre is the wildest, wickedest night spot between Basin Street and the Barbary Coast.” Evidence of this can still be seen in the 140 supposed bullet holes that have been found in the walls and ceiling. The Bird Cage was named for the cage style crib compartments suspended from the ceiling. It was in these “Bird Cages” that the “ladies of the evening” entertained their customers. The story goes that they were the inspiration for the song, “She’s only a bird in a gilded cage”, which was quite popular during the early 1900′s.

After the fire of 1882

Two major fires swept through Tombstone during the 1880′s. Legend has it that in June of 1881 a cigar ignited a barrel of whiskey at the Arcade Saloon. The subsequent fire destroyed over 60 businesses in the downtown area. But the town rebuilt itself and kept on growing. In May of 1882 another fire ripped through downtown Tombstone destroying a large portion of the business district. Again, the town rebuilt.

Welcome to Boothill Graveyard

Tombstone is also the home of Boothill Graveyard. Boothill began in 1879 and was used until 1884 when the New Tombstone City Cemetery was opened on west Allen Street. After the opening of the new cemetery, Boothill became known as “The Old Cemetery”. The City cemetery is still in use today. Legend has it that Boothill was named for the fact that many residents there died violent or unexpected deaths and were buried with their boots on. However, it was actually named Boothill after Dodge City’s pioneer cemetery in the hopes of attracting tourists in the late 1920′s. Many famous Tombstone folks lie there including the victims of the 1881 Shootout on Fremont Street between the Earps and the Cowboys. For many years, it was neglected. The desert overtook parts of it and vandals removed grave markers. Then, in the 1920′s concerned citizens began the process of cleaning up the Old Cemetery and researching the placement of the graves to preserve it for future generations (and to make a little money on tourism).

Click here to learn more about Tombstone’s Cemeteries.

Restored OK Corral Site

The most famous event in Tombstone’s history was the famed Gunfight at the OK Corral, which didn’t actually happen at the corral, but in a vacant lot on Fremont Street. On October 26, 1881, members of the “Cowboys” had a run-in with Wyatt, Virgil and Morgan Earp with help from Wyatt’s friend Doc Holliday. 24 seconds and 30 shots later, Billy Clanton, Tom and Frank McLaury were mortally wounded. In many peoples opinion, it was this one event that has kept Tombstone alive for all these years.

the 1882 Cochise County CourthouseIn 1882 the Cochise County Courthouse was built at a cost of around $45,000. It provided offices for the county sheriff, recorder, treasurer, board of supervisors, and included a well-built jail. The courthouse was a comfortable symbol of law and stability in these turbulent times. The county seat remained in Tombstone until voters in 1929 chose to move it to Bisbee, a bustling copper mining town 29 miles away. The last county office left the courthouse in 1931. Budget cuts in 2010 by Gov. Jan Brewer almost forced the Museums closure. Luckily the Tombstone Chamber of Commerce stepped in and met the demands from the state to take over operation of the museum.

Click here to learn more about the old Cochise County Courthouse

Abandoned buildings on Allen Street in the 1940's

As the silver mining continued the mineshafts were dug deeper and deeper to get the precious ore. Once they hit the 520 foot level, the water table was reached which flooded the mines. Attempts to pump out the water marginally worked for a few years but soon became too costly to continue. As the mining slowed down, the people of Tombstone started leaving, but not before $37,000,000 worth of ore had been taken from the many mines in the area. It is estimated that by the early 1930′s Tombstone’s population dwindled to around 150 people.

View of Tombstone

Today, Tombstone is home to around 1500 year round residents who enjoy the wonderful climate that Cochise County’s high desert has to offer and believe in preserving the history and heritage of the Wildest Town in the West!


TOMBSTONE
NAME: Tombstone
COUNTY: Cochise
ROADS: 2WD paved
LEGAL INFO: T20S, R22E
CLIMATE: Mild winter, hot summer
BEST TIME TO VISIT: Anytime
COMMENTS: Many ghost towns in the area that are worth seeing.
REMAINS: Many original buildings and cemetery.

Tombstone’s post office was established December 2, 1878 and is still in operation today. Tombstone became one of the most famous Arizona mining camps with its colorful history. Discovered by Ed Schieffelin in 1878, the mine went on to produce millions of dollars in silver ore. Tombstone had over 15,000 residents at the ehight of its operation. Fires nearly caused the death of Tombstone twice but the town was resilient. Famous for the O.K. Corral shootout with the Earps and Boot Hill cemetery, Tombstone is well worth the visit! –Tombstone has since earned the nick-name “the Town Too Tough to Die”. One day in 1877 the prospector Ed Schieffelin stood in Camp Huachuca and he looked out on the mountains in the northeast. The rich colors of the mountains looked very pleasing and full of promise and he decided to go there and dig a little. When he mentioned that to the soldier at his side, the soldier warned him against digging in that area, saying that the Apache indians that controlled and settled in the mountains, would respond with violence.“All you’ll find in those hills is your tomb-stone”. In February 1878 Schieffelin decided to go alone on the search after his fortune. He found a vein rich with silver ore, not the gold ore he was hoping for, but large enough to make him an instantly rich man. Remembering what the soldier had told him about never finding anything but his tombstone, he registered the two mining sites: “the Tombstone” and “the Graveyard”. He decided to send for his brother, Al, and have him come and survey the value of the ore so he traveled all the way to Signal (now ghost town about 170 miles away by plane from Tombstone). The brothers returned together with Mr. Richard K.Gird, who saw the ore value, and the brothers into a partnership. On the way back, Ed found two more spots teaming with silver ore and registered those lots as “Lucky Cuss” (his nich name for himself) and “the Toughnut” (he joked that will be “a tough nut to crack”). 40 million dollars in silver (value of 1.7 billion dollars today) was the result from those and other mines in the area between 1880-1886. Tombstone who flourished under the hunt of silver in the beginning of 1880 was known as one of the most notorious and violent towns in the Wild West – where the silver was king, – but now, Tombstone is a very nice place to visit.The city had 4 churches, a school, two banks, a newspaper (“The Epitaph”), one opera and about 15000 citizens. One big fire destroyed the Main Street in 1881 and in 1882, and each time it was built up again.

Ed Schieffelin left Tombstone and set off   after a new adventure to the Yukon. Despite the fact that these facts are difficult to verify, Tombstone was the place were men lived fast, and died quickly.

The fight which took place by the OK Corral in 1881 is remembered as the most notorious gun fight in the history of the town. The main reason for the shooting was a struggle for political power in the newly founded Cochise County. On the one side was Sheriff Johny Behan and Clanton clan who ran a place called “moonshine ranch” where they dabbled in stolen cattle and staged bar and coach robberies. The good guys were U.S. Marshall Wyatt Earp, his brothers Virgil and Morgan, and the known alcoholic gunman “Doc” Holliday. In the afternoon on October 26, came Earp brothers and Holliday to corner of Fremont and 3th Street where five young members of Clanton gang were looking a fight. According the late explanation of Ikke Clanton, Wyatt Earp pushed his gun into Clantons stomach and yelled “You son of a bitch, you can have a fight.” Clanton turned around and tried to run away, and in about 30 seconds, 3 of Clanton’s men were dead and Virgil and Morgan were serious wounded. The Earp brothers and Holliday were questened in court and found not guilty. Two months later around midnight a masked man tried to kill Virgil Earp, but they only invalided his arm for the rest of his live. Three months after that, an asian man killed Morgan Earp. Wyatt Earp, who worked outside the law to find the killer, killed 3 men who were suspected for the murder of his brother, and left Cochise County forever.

Because of the many killings that occured almost every day, President Chester Arthur was ready to send military into the town in hopes of getting some much needed help, when the troubles topped in 1882.  110 permits for serving the alcohol were given to bar and restaraunt owners.

In 1886, water was flooding into the mines which collapsed under the massive amount of water, and that was end of mining. Charleston and Millville, sister cities, died,  and Tombstone was seriously “wounded”. The numbers of citizens dropped but the town survived. Mines started to open again in 1890 an those worked until after the change of the new millenium, when flooding stopped the mining, yet again. When the town lost the title as County town to Bisbee, proclaimed the newspaper “Graham County Guardian”: “Tombstone got his dead stitch”. The pockets of silver in the mountains are changed to silver in the pockets by the tourists, and Tomb-stone is still in live and lives good as a tourist town by his history. Beside others, the restored Crystal Palace Saloon from 1879 were was the office of city Marshall Virgil Earp and Sheriff Johny Behan; and OK Corral, which became famous in one turbulent moment of shooting, are now booming tourist attractions, and are open again. Allen Street (named after John Allen), once filled with over 130 bars, casinos, bordells and the Courthouse have all been restored. The original Cochise County Court-house build in 1882, including court hall and gallows are now official  “State Historic Parks”.


OK Corral
Courtesy Dolores Steele

City Hall
Courtesy Dolores Steele

Tombstone Epitaph
Courtesy Dolores Steele

Longhorn – 1884
Courtesy Dolores Steele

Big Nose Kates Saloon
Courtesy Dolores Steele


Birdcage Theater – most famous Honky-Tonk in America between 1881 and 1889
Courtesy Dolores Steele


Tombstone
Courtesy Theresa and Cian Corcoran


Tombstone
Courtesy Theresa and Cian Corcoran


Tombstone
Courtesy Theresa and Cian Corcoran


Tombstone
Courtesy Theresa and Cian Corcoran


Tombstone
Courtesy Theresa and Cian Corcoran


Boot Hill
Courtesy Bobby Krause Zlatevski


Tombstone
Courtesy Bobby Krause Zlatevski


Ed Schieffelin Grave
Courtesy Bobby Krause Zlatevski


Tombstone
From the Johnnie Walker Collection
Courtesy Charlie Osborn


Tombstone
From the Johnnie Walker Collection
Courtesy Charlie Osborn


Tombstone
From the Johnnie Walker Collection
Courtesy Charlie Osborn


Tombstone
From the Johnnie Walker Collection
Courtesy Charlie Osborn


Tombstone
From the Johnnie Walker Collection
Courtesy Charlie Osborn


Tombstone
From the Johnnie Walker Collection
Courtesy Charlie Osborn


Tombstone
From the Johnnie Walker Collection
Courtesy Charlie Osborn


Tombstone in 1881
Courtesy Arizona Historical Society
John Heath Lynching Feb. 22, 1884
Courtesy Arizona Historical Society
Custom made Cherrywood Bar
Courtesy Dolores Steele
Card table in the Bird Cage
Courtesy Dolores Steele
Bird Cage Theater
Courtesy Dolores Steele
Tombstone
Courtesy Dolores Steele
Tombstone
Courtesy Dolores Steele
Tombstone
Courtesy Theresa and Cian Corcoran

Tombstone
Courtesy Theresa and Cian Corcoran


Tombstone
Courtesy Theresa and Cian Corcoran


Tombstone – late 1890s or early 1900s
Courtesy Tom McCurnin


Golden Nugget Saloon
Courtesy Bobby Krause Zlatevski


Tombstone – Courthouse
Courtesy Bobby Krause Zlatevski


Tombstone – Ed Schieffelin Monument
Courtesy Bobby Krause Zlatevski


Inside Crystal Palace Saloon
Courtesy Tom McCurnin


Tombstone – Silver Nugget Saloon
Courtesy Bobby Krause Zlatevski


Tombstone – Undertaker Car
Courtesy Bobby Krause Zlatevski


Tombstone – Undertaker Car
Courtesy Bobby Krause Zlatevski


Schieffelin Hall
Courtesy Tom McCurnin


St. Pauls
Courtesy Tom McCurnin


Miners Shack
Courtesy Tom McCurnin


Tombstone
From the Johnnie Walker Collection
Courtesy Charlie Osborn


Tombstone
From the Johnnie Walker Collection
Courtesy Charlie Osborn


Tombstone
From the Johnnie Walker Collection
Courtesy Charlie Osborn


Tombstone
From the Johnnie Walker Collection
Courtesy Charlie Osborn


Tombstone
From the Johnnie Walker Collection
Courtesy Charlie Osborn


Tombstone
From the Johnnie Walker Collection
Courtesy Charlie Osborn


Tombstone
From the Johnnie Walker Collection
Courtesy Charlie Osborn


Tombstone
From the Johnnie Walker Collection
Courtesy Charlie Osborn


VIDEO AVAILABLE

http://www.tombstoneweb.com/

http://www.ghosttowns.com/states/az/tombstone.html

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Posted on April 3, 2013, in archaeology, buildings, ethnography, folklore, ghost hunting, ghost stories, ghost towns, ghosts, guides, haunted histories, haunted places, historiography, history, oral history, paranormal, photography, preservation, research, sociology, supernatural, The Wild West, Tombstone, tours, travel, true ghost stories, true ghost stories, writing and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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